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Introducing the Ascendium-AIR Initiative: Identifying and Scaling Programmatic Technical Assistance Resources in Higher Education in Prison -- REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Our mission at the American Institutes for Research® (AIR®) is to generate and use rigorous evidence that contributes to a better, more equitable world. In partnership with Ascendium, we are embarking on an initiative that promises to benefit the field of Higher Education in Prison through the release of open resources and opportunities for shared learning. 

We have issued a Request for Proposals that invites Higher Education in Prison (HEP) programs to submit a proposal that addresses high-leverage technical assistance needs in the field. Selected grantees will engage in a dynamic community of practice that focuses on refining, scaling, and disseminating resources to the broader HEP field. 
 

What Grantees/Recipients Will Deliver
Cohort grantees will:
Generate Evidence -- Grantees will demonstrate the effectiveness of their resources within their unique contexts, contributing to fieldwide knowledge.
Refine and Disseminate -- Resources will be refined for applicability in other contexts and will be shared with the broader field. 
 

Please Join Us!!

We invite HEP program practitioners who are passionate about education equity to submit a proposal and be a part of our transformative journey. Your support is key. Together, we can unlock potential, foster equitable pathways, and create a brighter future for each learner.
 

The RFP is attached here. Please reach out to HEPResourceCohort@air.org with any questions. Stay tuned for updates, webinars, and opportunities to engage with us. For more information on the application process, click here.

Best regards, 

The AIR Project Team:

Ellen Cushing, Heather Erwin, & Christina Yancy

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Needed Specialists for a Challenging Task: Formerly Incarcerated Leaders' Essential Role in Postsecondary Programs in Prison

This research paper examines the development and administration of Hudson Link for Higher Education in Prison, an in-prison college program run and staffed primarily by its own formerly incarcerated graduates. This paper also explores the impact of lived experience on managing and teaching in the program, as well as strategies for academic partners looking to best support interventions led by those who are closest to the problem and, in turn, closest to the solution.

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Needed Specialists for a Challenging Task: Formerly Incarcerated Leaders' Essential Role in Postsecondary Programs in Prison

This research paper examines the development and administration of Hudson Link for Higher Education in Prison, an in-prison college program run and staffed primarily by its own formerly incarcerated graduates. This paper also explores the impact of lived experience on managing and teaching in the program, as well as strategies for academic partners looking to best support interventions led by those who are closest to the problem and, in turn, closest to the solution.

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Needed Specialists for a Challenging Task: Formerly Incarcerated Leaders' Essential Role in Postsecondary Programs in Prison

This research paper examines the development and administration of Hudson Link for Higher Education in Prison, an in-prison college program run and staffed primarily by its own formerly incarcerated graduates. This paper also explores the impact of lived experience on managing and teaching in the program, as well as strategies for academic partners looking to best support interventions led by those who are closest to the problem and, in turn, closest to the solution.

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Fall 2023 SUNY HEP Newsletter

The State University of New York's (SUNY) annual newsletter that details SUNY HEP programs and degrees, an interview with Chancellor John King Jr., graduation highlights, and alumni and faculty highlights. 

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Fall 2023 SUNY HEP Newsletter

The State University of New York's (SUNY) annual newsletter that details SUNY HEP programs and degrees, an interview with Chancellor John King Jr., graduation highlights, and alumni and faculty highlights. 

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Perspectives on Higher Education in Prison

"Perspectives on Higher Education in Prison," a series of essays from the State University of New York (SUNY), showcases the stories of SUNY students and others connected to higher education in prison—stories that inspire, challenge, and enrich their communities. By sharing these lived experiences, SUNY aims to illuminate the broader significance of prison education programs and garner the support needed to expand SUNY's exceptional offerings, ensuring equitable access to higher education for all incarcerated individuals.

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Perspectives on Higher Education in Prison

"Perspectives on Higher Education in Prison," a series of essays from the State University of New York (SUNY), showcases the stories of SUNY students and others connected to higher education in prison—stories that inspire, challenge, and enrich their communities. By sharing these lived experiences, SUNY aims to illuminate the broader significance of prison education programs and garner the support needed to expand SUNY's exceptional offerings, ensuring equitable access to higher education for all incarcerated individuals.

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Perspectives on Higher Education in Prison

"Perspectives on Higher Education in Prison," a series of essays from the State University of New York (SUNY), showcases the stories of SUNY students and others connected to higher education in prison—stories that inspire, challenge, and enrich their communities. By sharing these lived experiences, SUNY aims to illuminate the broader significance of prison education programs and garner the support needed to expand SUNY's exceptional offerings, ensuring equitable access to higher education for all incarcerated individuals.

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Participation & Outcomes in SUNY College-in-Prison Programs

This research report offers findings to guide discussions with program administrators, faculty, and formerly incarcerated students on how to improve student access, curriculum choice, retention, and completion. To see how SUNY programs serve people in New York prisons and after they leave incarceration, SUNY’s Office of Higher Education in Prison (SUNY HEP) created a longitudinal data system that links regularly collected student data from the SUNY Institutional Research Information System (SIRIS) and the National Student Clearinghouse with individual-level corrections data from DOCCS. This report, the third in a series (Gais, et al. 2019; Gais, Grace, and Wilner 2021), draws on these data to analyze incarcerated student enrollment, diversity, course subject areas, retention, and completion.

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Participation & Outcomes in SUNY College-in-Prison Programs

This research report offers findings to guide discussions with program administrators, faculty, and formerly incarcerated students on how to improve student access, curriculum choice, retention, and completion. To see how SUNY programs serve people in New York prisons and after they leave incarceration, SUNY’s Office of Higher Education in Prison (SUNY HEP) created a longitudinal data system that links regularly collected student data from the SUNY Institutional Research Information System (SIRIS) and the National Student Clearinghouse with individual-level corrections data from DOCCS. This report, the third in a series (Gais, et al. 2019; Gais, Grace, and Wilner 2021), draws on these data to analyze incarcerated student enrollment, diversity, course subject areas, retention, and completion.

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Measuring Reentry Success Beyond Recidivism

This resource brief explores the limitations of recidivism as a measure of reentry success and why other outcomes should be measured. It identifies alternative outcome measures and data sources that reentry programs can use to gauge program effectiveness and participant progress in areas relevant to their respective programs. It also discusses the importance of engaging people with direct reentry experience—either as program participants or staff—in defining meaningful outcome measures.

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Measuring Reentry Success Beyond Recidivism

This resource brief explores the limitations of recidivism as a measure of reentry success and why other outcomes should be measured. It identifies alternative outcome measures and data sources that reentry programs can use to gauge program effectiveness and participant progress in areas relevant to their respective programs. It also discusses the importance of engaging people with direct reentry experience—either as program participants or staff—in defining meaningful outcome measures.

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The Limits of Recidivism: Measuring Success After Prison

This book finds that the current measures of success for individuals released from prison are inadequate. The use of recidivism rates to evaluate post-release success ignores significant research on how and why individuals cease to commit crimes, as well as the important role of structural factors in shaping post-release outcomes. This book highlights the unique and essential insights held by those who have experienced incarceration and proposes that the development and implementation of new measures of post-release success would significantly benefit from active engagement with individuals with this lived experience. 

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The Limits of Recidivism: Measuring Success After Prison

This book finds that the current measures of success for individuals released from prison are inadequate. The use of recidivism rates to evaluate post-release success ignores significant research on how and why individuals cease to commit crimes, as well as the important role of structural factors in shaping post-release outcomes. This book highlights the unique and essential insights held by those who have experienced incarceration and proposes that the development and implementation of new measures of post-release success would significantly benefit from active engagement with individuals with this lived experience. 

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Ensuring the Confidentiality of Participant Data in Reentry Program Operations and Evaluation

This brief from the Evaluation and Sustainability Training and Technical Assistance (ES TTA) team at RTI International and the Center for Court Innovation discusses best practices in protecting and ensuring the confidentiality of participant data.

This brief also provides tips that are relevant to reentry practitioners seeking to protect client data as well as to research partners who are collecting or working with data as part of their evaluation.

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Ensuring the Confidentiality of Participant Data in Reentry Program Operations and Evaluation

This brief from the Evaluation and Sustainability Training and Technical Assistance (ES TTA) team at RTI International and the Center for Court Innovation discusses best practices in protecting and ensuring the confidentiality of participant data.

This brief also provides tips that are relevant to reentry practitioners seeking to protect client data as well as to research partners who are collecting or working with data as part of their evaluation.

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Best Practices for Collecting Primary Data from Reentry Populations for Program Evaluation

This resource brief from the Evaluation and Sustainability Training and Technical Assistance (ES TTA) Project at RTI International and the Center for Court Innovation provides guidance on key decisions that need to be made when undertaking primary data collection with reentering populations for reentry program evaluation.

The brief helps evaluators determine what data need to be collected, from whom, when, and how, and summarizes best practices in designing your data collection instrument and developing and implementing data collection protocols.

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Best Practices for Collecting Primary Data from Reentry Populations for Program Evaluation

This resource brief from the Evaluation and Sustainability Training and Technical Assistance (ES TTA) Project at RTI International and the Center for Court Innovation provides guidance on key decisions that need to be made when undertaking primary data collection with reentering populations for reentry program evaluation.

The brief helps evaluators determine what data need to be collected, from whom, when, and how, and summarizes best practices in designing your data collection instrument and developing and implementing data collection protocols.

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Surveying Participants to Strengthen Behavioral Health-Criminal Justice Programs

Participant satisfaction surveys help behavioral health-criminal justice programs assess the quality of service being provided and their impact on individual outcomes, as well as help them to determine if there are disparities in program and service delivery. This brief presents important considerations when developing these surveys for people with behavioral health needs in the criminal justice system and ways to integrate survey feedback meaningfully.

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Conducting Prison Research with a Racial-Equity Frame

This brief sets forth guiding values and recommendations for grounding prison research in principles of racial equity. These values are intended to help researchers more accurately capture and measure racial biases, and design and conduct research that can elevate and disrupt systemic biases.

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Participatory Research in Prisons

This brief is part of a larger research agenda for the Prison Research and Innovation Initiative, a fiveyear effort to leverage research and evidence to shine a much-needed light on prison conditions and pilot strategies to promote the well-being of people who live and work behind bars. The forthcoming research agenda aims to change the national narrative on corrections so that it embodies data-driven transformative innovations for reform and inclusive research approaches to build transparency and accountability for safer and more humane environments for people confined and working in them. 

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Two Regimes of Prison Data Collection

 In this column, political scientist and historian Kaneesha Johnson traces the changing form and content of prison data and questions how and why different communities and institutions collect the data they do. In particular, she compares the data gathered about crime and incarceration by the U.S. government with data gathered by incarcerated people and their communities in part to show that what we measure, collect, and count is always a reflection of the world we are trying to create. 

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Navigating the Approval Process for Prison Education Program Technology

Getting the approval for the technology and equipment necessary to operate high-quality postsecondary education in prison programs can present challenges. The steps in this resource from Jobs for the Future can help postsecondary and corrections education leaders develop a strategic approach to gaining buy-in for, implementing, and growing the use of technology to enhance and expand opportunities for quality postsecondary education in facilities. 

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Preparing Instructors to Support Students in Prison: Recommendations from the Formerly Incarcerated College Graduates Network (FICGN)

While correctional institutions provide orientation and training sessions to help instructors navigate the logistical and security aspects of teaching in such facilities, these efforts often have limitations. Notably, they tend to lack comprehensive guidance for instructors on effectively engaging students from a diverse range of cultural backgrounds and tailoring their pedagogical approaches to support students as they pursue their studies within the unique context of a correctional facility. 

In response to this identified gap, FICGN has collaborated with Jobs for the Future’s Center for Justice & Economic Advancement to support the development of high-quality postsecondary education programs in prisons that pave the way to economic advancement. Together, they have formulated the following guidance to offer support to program staff members and instructors. The recommendations presented in this resource are designed to enhance the effectiveness of future orientation and training initiatives. Their aim is to ensure that these programs adequately address the needs of instructors and other key stakeholders who will directly interact with students who are incarcerated for the first time.  

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Preparing Instructors to Support Students in Prison: Recommendations from the Formerly Incarcerated College Graduates Network (FICGN)

While correctional institutions provide orientation and training sessions to help instructors navigate the logistical and security aspects of teaching in such facilities, these efforts often have limitations. Notably, they tend to lack comprehensive guidance for instructors on effectively engaging students from a diverse range of cultural backgrounds and tailoring their pedagogical approaches to support students as they pursue their studies within the unique context of a correctional facility. 

In response to this identified gap, FICGN has collaborated with Jobs for the Future’s Center for Justice & Economic Advancement to support the development of high-quality postsecondary education programs in prisons that pave the way to economic advancement. Together, they have formulated the following guidance to offer support to program staff members and instructors. The recommendations presented in this resource are designed to enhance the effectiveness of future orientation and training initiatives. Their aim is to ensure that these programs adequately address the needs of instructors and other key stakeholders who will directly interact with students who are incarcerated for the first time.  

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Preparing Instructors to Support Students in Prison: Recommendations from the Formerly Incarcerated College Graduates Network (FICGN)

While correctional institutions provide orientation and training sessions to help instructors navigate the logistical and security aspects of teaching in such facilities, these efforts often have limitations. Notably, they tend to lack comprehensive guidance for instructors on effectively engaging students from a diverse range of cultural backgrounds and tailoring their pedagogical approaches to support students as they pursue their studies within the unique context of a correctional facility. 

In response to this identified gap, FICGN has collaborated with Jobs for the Future’s Center for Justice & Economic Advancement to support the development of high-quality postsecondary education programs in prisons that pave the way to economic advancement. Together, they have formulated the following guidance to offer support to program staff members and instructors. The recommendations presented in this resource are designed to enhance the effectiveness of future orientation and training initiatives. Their aim is to ensure that these programs adequately address the needs of instructors and other key stakeholders who will directly interact with students who are incarcerated for the first time.  

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The 2023 Colby College Justice Think Tank

The 2023 Colby College Justice Think Tank included 12 scholars from across all 5 Maine prisons selected through a competitive application process and stipended by the Alliance for Higher Education in Prison. During 2023, the Justice Think Tank Fellows conducted a research of their own design, supported by Colby faculty and staff ‘walkalongs’ who helped with document access, interview arrangements, and general support. The selected topic for 2023 was on the restorative alternatives that Maine could develop to keep emerging adults out of the criminal legal system, that could reform the Maine Criminal Code to be more restorative and less punitive, and that could support a more restorative pathway to reentry from prison. 

The 2023 Colby College Justice Think Tank offered two public presentations to showcase their research and methodology. The first, From the Inside Out: Systemic Political Transformation in Action, took place on Thursday November 9, at the National Conference on Higher Education in Prison in Atlanta, Georgia. The second, sponsored by the Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs at Colby College, was held on November 28 and hosted by the Goldfarb Center Student Executive Board, with introductions by Catherine Besteman, Justice Think Tank Founder, and Ved Price, Executive Director of the Alliance for Higher Education in Prison.

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The 2023 Colby College Justice Think Tank

The 2023 Colby College Justice Think Tank included 12 scholars from across all 5 Maine prisons selected through a competitive application process and stipended by the Alliance for Higher Education in Prison. During 2023, the Justice Think Tank Fellows conducted a research of their own design, supported by Colby faculty and staff ‘walkalongs’ who helped with document access, interview arrangements, and general support. The selected topic for 2023 was on the restorative alternatives that Maine could develop to keep emerging adults out of the criminal legal system, that could reform the Maine Criminal Code to be more restorative and less punitive, and that could support a more restorative pathway to reentry from prison. 

The 2023 Colby College Justice Think Tank offered two public presentations to showcase their research and methodology. The first, From the Inside Out: Systemic Political Transformation in Action, took place on Thursday November 9, at the National Conference on Higher Education in Prison in Atlanta, Georgia. The second, sponsored by the Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs at Colby College, was held on November 28 and hosted by the Goldfarb Center Student Executive Board, with introductions by Catherine Besteman, Justice Think Tank Founder, and Ved Price, Executive Director of the Alliance for Higher Education in Prison.

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Language Matters - How to Use Words to Promote Equitable Economic Advancement for All

This user-friendly Language Matters Gide builds on Job for the Future's 40 years of experience in the education and workforce ecosystem. The guide offers suggest ions on how to write and speak about people in ways that promote equity, dignity, and a focus on each individual's potential—rather than labeling them based on the systemic barriers they face.

Topics covered include skills and socioeconomic status, race and ethnicity, criminal justice, and more. Because language is fluid, the recommendations will evolve. 

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Language Matters - How to Use Words to Promote Equitable Economic Advancement for All

This user-friendly Language Matters Gide builds on Job for the Future's 40 years of experience in the education and workforce ecosystem. The guide offers suggest ions on how to write and speak about people in ways that promote equity, dignity, and a focus on each individual's potential—rather than labeling them based on the systemic barriers they face.

Topics covered include skills and socioeconomic status, race and ethnicity, criminal justice, and more. Because language is fluid, the recommendations will evolve. 

Ved Price

The First Year of Pell Restoration: A Snapshot of Quality, Equity, and Scale in Prison Education Programs

This report from the Vera Institute of Justice provides a snapshot of the Second Chance Pell Experimental Sites Initiative (SCP) a year after Pell Grants were restored for incarcerated students. Drawing on data collected from surveys to SCP colleges and corrections agencies, the report aggregates individual responses to evaluate the adequacy and the system of education offered to incarcerated people.

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Listserv Re-post: [Higher Ed in Prison] Prison Education: Topics in Educational Access, Outcomes, and Student Success

Colleagues -

Greetings and happy Monday (or whatever day it is that you read this). Many of you know that the Bloomsbury Prison Education Handbook is coming out October 3, 2024 so we're less than 4 months out. Given what seems to be a very positive internal response to the text, there have been conversations about a potential second book. As a result, I'll be putting together a proposal for said second text, with the hope that it covers the topics we didn't address in the handbook and expands on some that ARE in the handbook.

But the success of the proposal, and the text overall, depends upon the desire of folks to contribute chapters. So, for those who are interested in contributing to this second piece, please complete this Google Form that asks for a chapter title and abstract. For those who can provide this opportunity to incarcerated students, please provide them with a printed off version of the form and ask them to mail it to:

Dr. Erin S. Corbett

Second Chance Educational Alliance, Inc.

360 Bloomfield Avenue

Suite 301

Windsor, CT 06095

For those with technology access, this form will be open until Friday, June 28, 2024 at 5pm Eastern. For incarcerated persons, we will accept submissions through July 12, 2024.

Please share with your international networks for a larger reach. Hope to hear from many of you!

- E

Erin S. Corbett, EdD
 

Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

Founder, Chief Executive Officer

Second Chance Educational Alliance, Inc.

www.scea-inc.org 

860.578.8242 | ecorbett@sceainc.com 

Appointments Available HERE
 

Engage with us on Medium and Facebook!

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Listserv Re-post: [Higher Ed in Prison] Invitation to join an upcoming Vera and NACUBO webinar on Prison Education Program budgets

Greetings!

The Vera Institute of Justice along with the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) is invites you to a webinar titled “Prison Education Program Budgets: Best Practices from the Field.” Please see the description below as well as the link to register for the webinar.

Webinar Title: Prison Education Program Budgets: Best Practices from the Field

Date/Time: June 28, 2024, 2:00 PM EST

Webinar Description:

 

In 2023, incarcerated individuals again became eligible for Pell Grants to support their enrollment in approved prison education programs, enabling this unique population to further their education and making such programs a viable option for colleges and universities. However, the logistics of budgeting and financial aid can be challenging. Join the Vera Institute of Justice for a webinar, “Prison Education Programs Budgets: Identifying Best Practices for Higher Education Programs in Prisons Budgeting,” on Friday, June 28, 2024, at 2:00 ET.

 

The webinar will feature Ruth Johnston, vice president for consulting at the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) and former system vice chancellor and COO at New Mexico State University, along with panelists from other colleges who have experience implementing and financing prison education programs on their campuses. The webinar will give a high-level overview of the budgeting process and include a Q&A session.

Please register for the webinar here:

Best,

 

George Chochos, MPS, MDiv, STM

Senior Program Associate, Unlocking Potential (Postsecondary Education)

Vera Institute of Justice

1752 N Street NW, Suite 800

Washington, DC 20036

Cell: 202-465-0281

Email: gchochos@vera.org

 

For more information on Vera’s work go to vera.org

Follow Vera on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram

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Listserv Re-post: [Higher Ed in Prison] The Petey Greene Program is HIRING!

Hi All,

 
The Petey Greene Program is hiring! We have two open positions: one on our national team and one on our New Jersey team. Both would be a great fit for anyone interested in working for an educational justice organization that supports the academic goals of incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people through high-quality volunteer tutoring. 
 
The Division Manager will be responsible for ensuring the provision of high-quality tutoring services for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated students in New Jersey.  This includes managing several programmatic and university partnerships as well as potentially supervising an intern. The Division Manager reports to PGP’s Regional Manager, New Jersey. In the programmatic aspects of the role, the Division Manager will collaborate and coordinate with multiple types of partners, including higher education programs, and reentry providers, as well as prisons and jails. The Division Manager is responsible for determining the tutoring needs of program partners and participating students, developing semester program plans and collaboration agreements, and managing volunteer tutors. 
 

If you are interested, please apply here. The application closes on Friday.
 
As the Petey Greene Program begins implementation of an ambitious strategic plan that will guide our work from through 2028, the Executive Director of Development will play a vital role in developing and executing a comprehensive strategy to drive increased revenue growth for the Petey Greene Program that is diverse, sustainable, and includes a combination of earned revenue and private funding opportunities. The role is responsible for developing strategies to create new opportunities for revenue growth, retain current donors and funders, and expand the Petey Greene Program in accordance with the Petey Greene Program mission. 
 
 
If you are interested, please apply here. The application closes on 6/28.
 
Please share this information with your networks and anyone that you think would be a good fit. Please feel free to reach out with any questions! We appreciate your support.
 
Best,
Sarah Hirshorn

 
Headshot of Ashton Hoselton

Hello from EJP's Policy & Research Director

Hello! My name is Ashton Hoselton (she/hers) and I am the Policy & Research Director for the Education Justice Project, a unit of the University of Illinois and a college-in-prison program. Since 2008, EJP has provided academic programming to men at Danville Correctional Center, a medium-security, Illinois state facility. 

I look forward to learning from and collaborating with this group! 

Photo of Chancellor Ardis Eschenberg of Windward Community College

Aloha from Windward Community College

Aloha! I serve as chancellor at Windward Community College and founded our Puʻuhonua (Places of Sanctuary) Program in 2017, which serves three carceral insitutions in Hawaiʻi. 

Iʻm excited to get to meet others engaged in this work! 

 

Basia Skudrzyk

Looking forward to all the great work we can accomplish together!

Hi! My name is Basia, and I am the workforce development director for P2P (From Prison Cells to PhD) and senior faculty specialist at the University of Maryland working on an AgTech project that brings leading researchers together with farmers to help improve decision-making processes through the use of satellite data from space. 

I am a proud mother of two beautiful young ladies and three sweet pups in St. Louis, MO. I am first generation American and speak Polish fluently. I love to travel, read, cook, and explore when time allows. I am excited to be a part of this group and to learn from everyone to make necessary collective and sustainable change!

Here's a recent OpEd I wrote with my colleague, Mickey Saine, in Newsweek:

Want 'Second Chances' To Become Reality? We Need More Than Education | Opinion - Newsweek

 

White woman with brunette hair in a black blazer

JFF is HIRING! 3 New Director Roles!

Greetings, HEP Community,
 

Our team in JFF's Center for Justice & Economic Advancement is excited to announce that, in addition to the open manager position that we recently shared, our team is hiring for three, newly created, full-time roles at the director-level, two of which are now live and accepting applications!

Jobs for the Future (JFF) is a fair chance employer and people directly impacted by the legal system are STRONGLY encouraged to apply. All roles are fully remote (with the option to work from our offices in Boston, DC, or Oakland).

  1. Director, Justice and Mobility, Policy and Advocacy (Apply by: Friday, June 7th)

     

  2. Director, Research - Center for Justice and Economic Advancement (Apply by: Friday June 14, 2024)
     
  3. Director, Fair Chance Impact (Apply by: Thursday June 20, 2024)

Please share these opportunities with your networks and with anyone whom you feel might be interested!

Warmly,
Jenna Dreier

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Data Use Agreements - Jobs for the Future

Postsecondary education programs in prisons collect data on their students to inform program planning, assess students’ academic progress and outcomes, and meet institution, government, and funder reporting requirements. Also, programs applying to the U.S. Department of Education to become an approved prison education program (PEP) must include documentation in their application showing that their postsecondary institution has entered into an agreement with the oversight entity (typically a state department of corrections [DOC]) to obtain data on the transfer and release dates of incarcerated individuals. This resource walks you through the process of establishing consistent access to relevant DOC data on students who are incarcerated through the use of data use agreements (DUAs), also known as data sharing agreements (DSAs), with their DOC partners.

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Data Use Agreements - Jobs for the Future

Postsecondary education programs in prisons collect data on their students to inform program planning, assess students’ academic progress and outcomes, and meet institution, government, and funder reporting requirements. Also, programs applying to the U.S. Department of Education to become an approved prison education program (PEP) must include documentation in their application showing that their postsecondary institution has entered into an agreement with the oversight entity (typically a state department of corrections [DOC]) to obtain data on the transfer and release dates of incarcerated individuals. This resource walks you through the process of establishing consistent access to relevant DOC data on students who are incarcerated through the use of data use agreements (DUAs), also known as data sharing agreements (DSAs), with their DOC partners.

White woman with brunette hair in a black blazer

Data Use Agreements

To have consistent access to relevant DOC data on students who are incarcerated, postsecondary institutions should establish data use agreements (DUAs), also known as data sharing agreements (DSAs), with their DOC partners. This brief breaks down the basics of establishing a DUA.